Gonodonta nutrix  
Upon my Pond Apple tree, camouflaged against a branch, I found a cute black caterpillar with red spots and white stripes.

A brief search of the rest of the tree revealed quite a few more of the little gonodonta nutrix, or citrus fruit-piercer moth caterpillars. Each of the instars I found had a slightly different appearance.

citrus fruit-piercer, gonodonta nutrix, caterpillar on pond apple tree branch
 
This caterpillar on my fingertip was the smallest caterpillar, or earliest instar, that I could get a decent photograph of. When they move, or when you startle them, they curl up the front of their body like this tiny one on my fingertip. They crawl a lot like a looper. Let's have a closer look at those reddish-orange dots and white spots:
citrus fruit-piercer, gonodonta nutrix, tiny caterpillar in looper stance on my finger
citrus fruit-piercer, gonodonta nutrix, caterpillar, early instar
citrus fruit-piercer, gonodonta nutrix, tiny caterpillar on my finger
 
It took quite a while to coax the tiny caterpillar into stretching out so I could document its decoration.

They're very squishable at this size, so I didn't want to nudge it too firmly.

citrus fruit-piercer, gonodonta nutrix, caterpillar, early instar
Each instar seems to have more markings than the previous one.
citrus fruit-piercer, gonodonta nutrix, caterpillar
citrus fruit-piercer, gonodonta nutrix, caterpillar on a pond apple tree leaf
citrus fruit-piercer, gonodonta nutrix, caterpillar
citrus fruit-piercer, gonodonta nutrix, caterpillar, latter instar
citrus fruit-piercer, gonodonta nutrix, caterpillar
citrus fruit-piercer, gonodonta nutrix, cocoon
citrus fruit-piercer, gonodonta nutrix, caterpillar in cocoon
citrus fruit-piercer, gonodonta nutrix, cocoon
I want photographs of the gonodonta nutrix moth that this caterpillar turns into after it pupates, so I brought a few inside to raise in a bug box. When I went to provide them fresh leaves, and dump out the caterpillar frass, I found this tangle of bits of leaf:
See all the little tiny bits of leaf the caterpillar chewed off and dropped?
I lifted the branch gently to isolate it in its own bug box (so the other caterpillars couldn't eat it) and was surprised to see that the caterpillar only built the top of the shelter:
I was happy to find a similar cocoon on the tree. Of course, I brought that one in as well.

While I was out there, I searched high and low for a very tiny caterpillar so I could photograph the first instar. They were well hidden, or all gobbled up, or my eyesight just simply rots. I'm guessing one of the former two, because I did find several eggs:

Speaking of gobbled up, I found this dead caterpillar, still hanging from the leaf, that something killed. Have you any idea what that little thing hanging onto it might be?

It seemed a bit small to be making a cocoon, and after I disturbed it by picking up the branch it crawled out, so I released it on the pond apple tree and brought in a larger caterpillar to raise.
citrus fruit-piercer, gonodonta nutrix, egg
citrus fruit-piercer, gonodonta nutrix, egg and fingertip
citrus fruit-piercer, gonodonta nutrix, dead caterpillar, and a chewed pond apple leaf
While I can't say for sure what led to the demise of that small caterpillar, I have no doubts about the cause of death of this one:
Florida predatory stink bug, euthyrhynchus floridanus beetle eating a citrus fruit-piercer, gonodonta nutrix, caterpillar, and 
			my thumb at the edge of the pond apple tree leaf for perspective on size
This very large beetle is a Florida predatory stink bug, Euthyrhynchus floridanus. It's obviously predatory; check out that huge proboscis stuck in the citrus fruit-piercer (gonodonta nutrix) caterpillar. The beetle was out feeding several times when I went to observe the caterpillars on the pond apple tree.

If all goes well, and the caterpillars I brought in become moths, I'll try to get them to pose for pictures before I let them go.

Little update - on a baby pond apple tree, only about a foot and a half tall, I found a spider eating one of the citrus fruit-piercer caterpillars.

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